Monthly Archives: November 2016

Places to Visit in Kathmandu

1.    Pashupatinath Temple
Pashupati is a Hindu temple on the banks of the Bagmati River. It is committed to an indication of Shiva called Pashupati (Lord of Animals). It pulls in a large number of pioneers every day and has gotten to be extraordinary a long ways past the Kathmandu Valley. The sanctuary is banned to non-Hindus; however a decent perspective of the sanctuary can be had from the inverse bank of the waterway.

2.    Kathmandu Durbar Square
Kathmandu Durbar Square was the place the city’s rulers were once delegated and legitimized, and from where they governed (‘durbar’ implies castle). Accordingly, the square remains the customary heart of the old town and Kathmandu’s most tremendous legacy of conventional building design. The Durbar Square is encompassed with stupendous construction modeling and distinctively showcases the aptitudes of the Newar craftsmen and experts more than a few centuries.
It is known as Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square, a name got from a statue of Hanuman, the monkey aficionado of Lord Ram, at the passage of the castle.

3.    Bouddhanath Stupa
Bouddhanath Stupa is the biggest stupa in Nepal. The Stupa is situated in the Bouddha, on the eastern edges of Kathmandu. Buddnath was likely implicit the 14th century after the Mughal attacks; different fascinating legends are told with respect to the explanations behind its development. Truly, the stupa was an important staging post on the exchange course among Lhasa and Kathmandu. Amid the celebration of Losar, Tibetan New Year in February or March, Boudhanath has the biggest festival.

4.    Swoyambhu Nath Stupa
Buddhist sanctuary of Swayambhunath, arranged on the highest point of a slope, west of Kathmandu, is a standout amongst the most well known, sacred and immediately conspicuous images of Nepal. Referred to travelers as the Monkey Temple is home to hundreds monkeys considered sacred to Tibetan Buddhists and Hindus. Verifiable records found on a stone engraving give prove that the stupa was at that point an essential Buddhist journey destination by the 5th century A.D. i.e. prior to the happening to Buddhism in the valley.